Health & Nutrition | Dogs | October 2, 2015

How Much Protein is Enough in Dog Food?

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Protein is a hot topic in dog nutrition, so how much is enough and how much is too much? When people think of protein they typically think of meat, however there are many sources of protein. Some of these include grains, seeds, pulses, and vegetables.

It is the essential amino acids found in protein, rather than the protein itself, that is required by dogs. Both essential and non-essential amino acids are found in plant and animal protein in varying levels.

Each protein source varies in the amount and type of amino acids that it supplies. Although the structure of an amino acid is the same regardless of the protein source, the amount of amino acids that each protein supplies is unique. Protein and essential amino acid requirements can be met by animal protein sources, complementary plant sources, or a combination of both animal and plant sources. Complete and balanced pet foods must contain all of the essential amino acids in the amounts required by dogs.
Dietary essential amino acids are required by both dogs and cats. Amino acid requirements of dogs and cats are very different, as cats are obligate carnivores and use protein for energy, whereas dogs prefer to utilize carbohydrates and fats. Cats have an additional requirement for the amino acid taurine. For dogs, this amino acid is considered conditionally essential, meaning that it is only required in specific situations

Taurine is only found in animal protein sources, so it is important for cats to consume at least some of their protein from meat.

How much protein is enough? Historically dog food has been around 22-26% protein. This level is more than adequate to supply essential amino acids for most dogs. There are a few cases where higher protein levels are needed, such as for performance animals or critically ill patients. Conversely, decreased levels of protein may be necessary for specific heath issues. It is important to remember that what is not utilized for tissue maintenance or energy production will be stored as fat and the products of protein metabolism will be excreted in the urine.